Opinion

Hill families and others settle in area

Hill families and others settle in area

Other early pioneer families also had a lasting impact and influence on the community of Eliasville and the surrounding area of the two counties of Young and Stephens. The Hill family led by Thomas Hill and Amanda (Randall) Hill, who married in Alabama and arrived here in 1876, in a caravan of wagons bearing more settlers. Accompanying them were their two sons, George W. and Samuel H. Hill. They acquired land southwest of Eliasville, in Stephens County, along the Clear Fork of the Brazos River. They ranched and were friendly to the local Indians, most likely the Tonkawa.

Virtual tax school was even more boring

Virtual tax school was even more boring

In August or September, during a “normal” year, I attend a tax school in some big city where I study very hard for three days, eat at nice restaurants, take in a show, and shop a little on the way home. I’ve been to Chicago, New York, San Diego, and Denver. And … I can take it off my taxes as a business expense. Of course, not the show and the shopping, but most of everything else.

Occupandi temporis

Occupandi temporis

Many of us have heard the Latin words, ‘Carpe diem.’ According to dictionary. com the Latin phrase means, “seize the day.” “It is used to encourage someone to make the most of the present rather than dwelling on the future.” However, it falls short in context. The whole quote is, “Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero.” According to elitedaily.com “this roughly translates to ‘Seize the day, trusting as little as possible to the future.’”

Donnell brothers impact Eliasvill

Donnell brothers impact Eliasvill

The Donnell brothers had a huge impact on the town of Eliasville by building the Donnell Mill and Dam. Later, the Donnell brothers built a suspension bridge over the river near the mill. Much later, that bridge was replaced by a much larger, more substantial bridge in 1893. Still later, a more modern bridge was constructed at the site. Most of the mill was destroyed by fire from a lightning strike and was rebuilt and burned again in 1927.

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Breckenridge American


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